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Orphaned and forgotten: Africa’s children

A tour in the name of hope

Every day, almost 4,000 people in Africa die because of AIDS, many of which are parents. What happens to their children? “Until today, AIDS has robbed 17 million children of their mothers, their fathers, or both”, says UNICEF. In the traditional African extended families, whole generations die because of AIDS and the lack of medication. The old and the very young are left alone. It’s a humanitarian tragedy which hasn’t made the headlines for a long time, yet grows day by day.

We want to raise awareness of Africa’s forgotten children. Join us on an exceptional journey – the “Ride for Hope Coast to Coast Africa” – riding on motorbikes from one coast to the other. We’re an initiative of Christ’s Hope e.V. (Germany), an organization dedicated to helping those infected with and affected by HIV/AIDS in Africa.

Don’t look away!
Experience a motorbike tour through Africa – with us

We are going to show you how different African countries and regions deal with the subject of HIV/AIDS and what burdens the children have to bear. We show you places of hope and genuine help that you can support directly, such as the Christ’s Hope CarePoints, vital venues for orphans which are exclusively funded by donations and which provide the children with everything they need.

During our tour, you are going to find every one of our ideas and every aspect of your help for these essential projects on this website.

The AIDS crisis
Africa’s children need help

Sub-Saharan Africa remains the region of the world most affected by the AIDS epidemic. More than two thirds, 68 % of all infected people in the world live in this region (UNAIDS World AIDS report 2011).

Who cares for these orphaned children? Who gives them something to eat? Who helps them overcome their traumatic experiences? More and more of them have nobody who cares and provides for them. Many extended families break apart and are no longer able to perform this traditional task. The number of adults declines, while the number of orphans grows.